Headless Wedding Portraits: The Boutonnieres

Let us continue our exploration into the land of "headless" photography.  As previously mentioned, headless photographs are essential in wedding photography in order to capture the details of the wedding.  Last time, we looked at how headless photographs allow us to focus on the bouquets of the bride and her bridal party.  In this post, we will look at how headless photographs allow us to focus on the boutonnieres--also known as the men's flowers.

Photo Courtesy Of Bonafide Bride

Weddings are full of rituals and traditions.  Like bouquets, boutonnieres have been a tradition in weddings for many, many years.  In fact, the tradition dates back to ancient Greece.  In ancient Greece, the wedding party would carry flowers and herbs to ward off bad smells, diseases, and evil spirits.  In the early 20th Century, boutonnieres became a common adornment on a gentleman’s jacket to be worn for formal occasions.  Boutonnieres, also known as buttonholes are, traditionally, made up of one or two flowers with a small amount of greenery.  Although boutonnieres may no longer be worn for the same protective purpose for which they were originally intended, they continue to adorn the suit jackets of many grooms today. 

The same time, thought, and consideration placed on choosing the right flowers for the bride's bouquet is often placed on choosing the right flowers for the groom's boutonniere.  Like the bride's bouquet, there should be some focus given to groom's boutonniere in wedding photos.

Photo Courtesy Of Style Me Pretty

Grooms aren't the only ones who wear boutonnieres for a wedding.  One boutonniere ritual is for the groom and his groomsmen, the fathers, grandfathers and ushers to wear a boutonniere on the left of their suit jackets above the heart.  Even when grooms and groomsmen choose to go without suit jackets (like the ones pictured in the photographs below), many still decide to wear boutonnieres.  Similar to bridal bouquets, boutonnieres can capture the personality of the groom and his groomsmen.  The unique flare of groomsmen's boutonnieres can be highlighted, as they are in the following photos, using a headless photography method.

Photo Courtesy Of Green Wedding Shoes

The compilation photograph below captures the boutonnieres of the groom with his groomsmen.  Though just about anyone who attends the wedding can wear a boutonniere, the groom’s boutonniere should be the most pronounced of the wedding party. 

Photo Courtesy Of Bill Blakey

Headless wedding photographs allow us to draw more attention to the details of the wedding.  A bride's bouquet is a detail she will want to remember and the boutonniere may be a detail the groom wants to remember as well.  Not all men choose to wear boutonnieres for their weddings, but if they do, it may be nice capture a few shots of them.

Photo Courtesy Of Once Wed