Why Photographs of Watches and Clocks Show the Time 10:10

I just came across an interesting NY Times article talking about how and why watches and clocks found in product photographs and advertisements usually show the time 10:10? If you haven't, pay attention the next time you’re flipping through a publication and come across a watch ad—the rule is almost always true.

Want to know why?

According to the New York Times, the main reason is quite simple and obvious: aesthetics. There are a number of visual advantages to having the hands set at the 10:10 positions.

Because brand names generally are centered on the upper half of a watch, hands positioned at 10 and 2 "frame the brand and logo," said Andrew Block, executive vice president at Tourneau, the watch retailer, which has 51 stores worldwide. "It’s almost like an unwritten rule that everyone understands to photograph a watch a 10:10."

Also, the hands are kept from overlapping. Having them on both sides of the watch face ensures that the hands themselves are visible and can be appreciated.
The position also allows the hands to look nice on the face of the timepiece. The 10:10 position is symmetrical, and the human brain tends to appreciate symmetry and orderliness.

Finally, the 10:10 hands look “happy” due to the fact that the hands look like a smile (or like a “V” as in “victory”). The NYTimes reports that Timex used to use the time 8:20 in their product photos, but eventually decided to turn that “frown” upside-down.

There are a number of urban legends regarding the 10:10 time floating around in the world. Many of them attribute it to a historic event (e.g. Lincoln/JFK assassinations, the dropping of the atomic bombs), but there isn’t any truth behind those explanations.

Image found on "PetaPixel" 

Image found on "PetaPixel